Social Anxiety and Teeth Grinding

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Thousands of people suffer from anxiety; in fact, it is fairly common for people to suffer from an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders usually affect the lives of sufferers in many ways and can be very difficult to manage. But, something that anxiety sufferers may not have realized is that their anxiety could be affecting their oral health.Roughly one in six adult Americans are affected by an anxiety disorder, and this number encompasses anxiety disorders such as panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. A new study done by Tel Aviv University researchers found that anxiety experienced within social circumstances increased the risk of bruxism, known as teeth grinding.If you have social anxiety, then talk to your dentist about ways to treat bruxism. They may be able to help you find a treatment plan before your anxiety causes serious damage to your teeth.

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Easy Ways to Prevent TMJ

Do you have pain in the back of your mouth that doesn’t go away? It might be more than just an annoyance that disrupts your everyday routine. If you’ve ever experienced a locked jaw, facial swelling or even hearing problems, then you may find yourself with a temporomandibular joint disorder, better known as TMJ. Many people go months or even years without ever realizing the pain they are having is from TMJ.

Dental Anxiety? Try Sedation Dentistry

Just the thought of visiting the dentist or undergoing a specific procedure can cause some patients to feel anxious. At Hammond Pond Dental Group, we do everything possible to ensure all visits are comfortable and stress-free. However, some patients still need a little extra help relaxing.

Experience the advantages of our multidisciplinary dental office today!

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